NASN 2015

by SKHC Editor on June 23, 2015

The National Association of School Nurses (NASN) 47th Annual Conference is upon us!  It’s hard to believe a year has gone by already.  This year’s conference is in none other than the City of Brotherly Love – Philadelphia.

The NASN annual conference gives school nurses a chance to come together, share stories, challenges, and accomplishments.  On top of that, the top notch educational sessions offered provide not only great takeaways, but validation of personal contributions.

School Kids Healthcare is excited to attend the NASN 47th Annual Conference.  Please stop and visit Kim at booth 612 and pick up a special flyer about our NEW Online Loyalty Rewards Program as well as a special promo code.

Thanks again for all you do and here’s to a great conference!

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The 2015 School Kids Healthcare Catalog Is Here!

by SKHC Editor on May 13, 2015

It’s been a long time coming, but the 2015 School Kids Healthcare catalog is finally here!  Request your copy today and see new products including:

Also look for new callouts throughout the School Kids Healthcare catalog to quickly find Online Loyalty brands.  With the School Kids Healthcare Online Loyalty Rewards Program you will earn points on your online purchase of select loyalty branded products at published list prices.  You may then redeem your points on future online purchases.  It’s as easy as 1, 2, 3!

Sign up today and receive 500 FREE Loyalty Points!  To learn more about the School Kids Healthcare Online Loyalty Rewards Program please see our FAQs and Terms and Conditions.

SKH eRewardsLogo CMYK

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Introducing the Barracuda™ Intruder Defense System

by SKHC Editor on March 18, 2015

The Barracuda™ Intruder Defense System is helping keep classrooms and public buildings safe in the event of an active shooter situation.  The Barracuda™ is a security device that can be installed in a matter of seconds in emergency situations to protect occupants against building intruders.

The Barracuda™ Intruder Defense System is available in three configurations to ensure a perfect fit for your door:

Barracuda™ Model DSI for Inward Swinging Doors
Barracuda™ Model DSO for Outward Swinging Doors
Barracuda™ Model DCS for Scissor Action Door Closers

The Barracuda™ Intruder Defense System was invented by Troy Lowe, a decorated military, who is currently a firefighter and SWAT team member in Ohio. As a SWAT team medic, he works to prevent these tragedies in his community through shooter response training programs.

To learn more about this security device please take a moment to watch a short demonstration video as well as a newscast on how Southwest Licking Schools have put the device to the Barracuda™ to use.

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Hand Washing 101

by SKHC Editor on December 17, 2014

Washing your hands is one of the most important steps you can take to avoid getting sick and spreading germs to others.  Did you know that many diseases and conditions are spread by not washing hands with soap and clean, running water?  If soap and water are not available you can always use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol to clean your hands.

So, when exactly should you wash your hands?  Here are some prime examples:

  • Before, during, and after preparing food
  • Before eating food
  • Before and after caring for someone who is sick
  • Before and after treating a cut or wound
  • After using the toilet
  • After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet
  • After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing
  • After touching an animal, animal feed, or animal waste
  • After handling pet food or pet treats
  • After touching garbage

How should you wash your hands?

  • Wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold), turn off the tap, and apply soap.
  • Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Be sure to lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.
  • Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice.
  • Rinse your hands well under clean, running water.
  • Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them.

Teaching kids early on the proper way to wash hands is super fun and easy with the Glo Germ™ Handwashing Training Kit.  The Glo Germ™ Kit demonstrates germ communication, cross-contamination, effectiveness of sanitary practices, and more.  Check it out at School Kids Healthcare.

Source: cdc.gov

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Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is one of more than 100 non-polio enteroviruses. This virus was first identified in California in 1962.  Every year millions of children in the United States catch enteroviruses, usually during summer and fall, however this year hospitals have been seeing more children with severe respiratory illness caused by EV-D68 since mid-August.

Infants, children, and teenagers are at higher risk than adults for getting infected and sick with enteroviruses like EV-D68.  Due to their age they have not been exposed to these types of viruses before, and they do not yet have immunity built up to fight the disease.  Children with asthma may be at a greater risk for severe respiratory illness from EV-D68.

Mild symptoms of EV-D68 may include fever, runny nose, sneezing, cough, and body and muscle aches.  Severe symptoms may include wheezing and difficulty breathing.  There is no specific treatment for EV-D68.  You can protect your family in avoiding catching and spreading EV-D68 by following some basic steps to stay healthy.

  • Wash hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds. Washing hands correctly is the most important thing you can do to stay healthy.
  • Avoid touching eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact, such as kissing, hugging, and sharing cups or eating utensils, with people who are sick.
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue or shirt sleeve, not your hands.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces, such as toys and doorknobs, especially if someone is sick.
  • Stay home when you are sick and keep sick children out of school.

Source: cdc.gov

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