Hand Washing 101

by SKHC Editor on December 17, 2014

Washing your hands is one of the most important steps you can take to avoid getting sick and spreading germs to others.  Did you know that many diseases and conditions are spread by not washing hands with soap and clean, running water?  If soap and water are not available you can always use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol to clean your hands.

So, when exactly should you wash your hands?  Here are some prime examples:

  • Before, during, and after preparing food
  • Before eating food
  • Before and after caring for someone who is sick
  • Before and after treating a cut or wound
  • After using the toilet
  • After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet
  • After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing
  • After touching an animal, animal feed, or animal waste
  • After handling pet food or pet treats
  • After touching garbage

How should you wash your hands?

  • Wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold), turn off the tap, and apply soap.
  • Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Be sure to lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.
  • Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice.
  • Rinse your hands well under clean, running water.
  • Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them.

Teaching kids early on the proper way to wash hands is super fun and easy with the Glo Germ™ Handwashing Training Kit.  The Glo Germ™ Kit demonstrates germ communication, cross-contamination, effectiveness of sanitary practices, and more.  Check it out at School Kids Healthcare.

Source: cdc.gov

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Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is one of more than 100 non-polio enteroviruses. This virus was first identified in California in 1962.  Every year millions of children in the United States catch enteroviruses, usually during summer and fall, however this year hospitals have been seeing more children with severe respiratory illness caused by EV-D68 since mid-August.

Infants, children, and teenagers are at higher risk than adults for getting infected and sick with enteroviruses like EV-D68.  Due to their age they have not been exposed to these types of viruses before, and they do not yet have immunity built up to fight the disease.  Children with asthma may be at a greater risk for severe respiratory illness from EV-D68.

Mild symptoms of EV-D68 may include fever, runny nose, sneezing, cough, and body and muscle aches.  Severe symptoms may include wheezing and difficulty breathing.  There is no specific treatment for EV-D68.  You can protect your family in avoiding catching and spreading EV-D68 by following some basic steps to stay healthy.

  • Wash hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds. Washing hands correctly is the most important thing you can do to stay healthy.
  • Avoid touching eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact, such as kissing, hugging, and sharing cups or eating utensils, with people who are sick.
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue or shirt sleeve, not your hands.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces, such as toys and doorknobs, especially if someone is sick.
  • Stay home when you are sick and keep sick children out of school.

Source: cdc.gov

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Cudahy, WI – September 8, 2014School Kids Healthcare (SKHC), a leading distributor of school nurse supplies and health room equipment, announced the addition of CPR RsQ Assist® to its growing line of medical supplies and equipment.

FDA-Approved CPR RsQ Assist® Makes It Easier for Anyone to Perform Hands-Only CPR

CPR RsQ Assist®
CPR RsQ Assist® is a first-of-its-kind, FDA-approved hands-only chest compression device designed to eliminate the intimidation factor of performing CPR.  This easy-to-use device guides you through the steps of performing effective CPR, and has been shown in independent clinical studies to reduce fatigue by 90 percent and increase performance results by 94.5 percent over traditional CPR.¹

“This product complements the science behind hands-only CPR, and makes it easier to provide early, quality bystander CPR,” said Joe Hanson, inventor of CPR RsQ Assist®. “It’s an essential safety device just like a fire extinguisher or smoke detector, which we hope will help save more lives following sudden cardiac arrest.”

“We are extremely pleased to partner with Joe Hanson and offer our customers a first-of-its-kind, FDA-approved hands-only device,” said Kim Alexander, Strategic Marketing Manager for School Kids Healthcare.

CPR RsQ Assist® has easy-to-follow voice commands, along with an audio and visual metronome. It talks you through the steps of calling 911, placing the device in the center of the victim’s chest, and instructs you to push 100 times per minute until help arrives. To address fatigue, the product has an ergonomic design with an easy-to-grip, non-slip handle. The design allows you to leverage upper body strength and weight as you push down, delivering quality compressions in the center of the chest over minimal clothing, if needed.

CPR RsQ Assist® is FDA-approved for use on people eight years of age and older. It is an essential safety tool to keep at home, in the workplace, in the car or anyplace where there are two or more people.  The device is available with a custom-designed wall cabinet and signage for easy placement adjacent to an AED machine so rescuers have easy access to both lifesaving devices. The current American Heart Association guidelines call for at least 100 chest compressions per minute for at least two minutes prior to using an AED machine. For more product details, please visit CPR RsQ Assist Product Page.

¹Continuous-Chest Compression Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation for Cardiac Arrest Circulation. 2007:116:2894-2896.

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To create an even greater shopping experience for our customers, enhancements have been made to the School Kids Healthcare website that support responsive design, which allows optimal viewing across a wide range of devices, including smartphones and tablets. Users can easily navigate the site, view larger images, have more video viewing options, and quickly checkout using a variety of handheld devices.

“We are extremely pleased to offer our customers more options to save on school nurse supplies and everyday products as well as improving the shopping experience through our website’s updated interface,” said Kim Alexander, Strategic Marketing Manager for School Kids Healthcare.

Come check out our new look at www.schoolkidshealthcare.com.

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School Kids Healthcare Going from UPS to FedEx

by SKHC Editor on January 22, 2014

School Kids Healthcare to Move Small Parcel Carrier from UPS to FedEx!

School Kids Healthcare cares about their customers and strives to provide them with the best service possible.  In an effort to improve our shipping process we will be transitioning our primary small parcel carrier from UPS to FedEx over the next several weeks.

What does this mean to you?  Better service.  This change will not only provide you with timely deliveries of your medical products and supplies, but you should also see a decrease in damaged shipments.  Even better, depending on your location, you may receive your shipments even faster.

FedEx is a trusted carrier that handles over 10 million shipments each day.  We are confident that they will handle your shipments with respect, accuracy, and timely delivery.

Please know there is nothing you need to do.  This transition will be seamless.  However, if you do have any questions about this change, or need additional information please, please call our knowledgeable Customer Service Team at 866.558.0686.

Sincerely,
School Kids Healthcare

P.S.
Did you know School Kids Healthcare pays all regular ground shipping charges?  Exceptions would include orders with special shipping requests, orders for resale, and all orders outside of the contiguous United States.  Please note that all orders under $175.00 are subject to a $10.50 handling fee.

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Cold & Flu Remedies: Q & A

by SKHC Editor on November 21, 2013

Did you know the best way to blow your nose is one nostril at a time?  Yes, according to WebMD you’re encouraged to cover one nostril, blow gently and repeat as necessary.  The pressure from using all of your force could not only cause an earache, but it could potentially force the mucus back into your sinuses.  Also, using a decongestant can help clear a stuffy nose, so you won’t have to blow as much.

How do you deal with a dry, hacking cough?  Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines, such as cough suppressants, will help suppress a cough.  Using a humidifier and gargling with warm salt water – which can help reduce throat inflammation – gives much needed moisture.

What can relieve the pain of an achy ear due to congestion?  An over-the-counter decongestant can ease the day by relieving the pressure and pain.

How many days in a row can you use a nasal decongestant?  To avoid symptom rebound (worse nasal swelling when the medication wears off) do not use a decongestant spray for more than three days in a row.

Take the Cold and Flu Remedies: What Works? Quiz on WebMD and see how you score.

Source: webmd.com

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American Diabetes Month®

by SKHC Editor on November 13, 2013

Nearly 26 million children and adults in the United States have diabetes.  Another 79 million Americans have prediabetes and are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes.  The American Diabetes Association (ADA) has estimated the total national cost of diagnosed diabetes in the United States is $245 billion.

If those numbers weren’t staggering enough think about this: every 17 seconds someone is diagnosed with diabetes, that’s 5000 new cases every day.  In the next 24 hours over 130 people will develop kidney failure because of diabetes.  In the next 24 hours diabetes will claim the lives of 200 people.

It’s November, it’s American Diabetes Month® (ADM), and it’s time to come together and Stop Diabetes®!  The vision of the ADA is a life free of diabetes and all of the burdens that go with it.  Raising awareness of this continually growing disease is one of the main efforts behind the mission of the ADA.

How can you help the fight to Stop Diabetes®?  You can advocate, get walking, get riding, volunteer, and/or donate.

How do you know if you’re at risk?  Take the diabetes risk test and see how you score.

Source: diabetes.org, stopdiabetes.com

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Recertified AEDs Are a Hit

by SKHC Editor on October 29, 2013

It was only nine months ago we started offering recertified AEDs and well, it’s a hit!

Recertified AEDs are the choice for schools, clinics, and other public settings that are looking to stretch their budget. All recertified AEDs are comprehensively tested and certified to meet the same performance standards as new units.  Not only do all recertified AEDs come with a one year warranty, but Basic and Premium Service Plans are available, including free loaner programs.

If that wasn’t enough, we now offer a program where you can trade in and trade up to a “new” recertified AED.  It’s simple, just give us a call and let us know what model AED you’d like to trade in. We’ll do some homework and get back to you ASAP with the trade in value of your unit(s). If you accept our offer you’re then able to apply the trade in credit towards a “new” recertified AED.

Take a moment and check out what we have to offer.

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Trade In and Trade Up

October 22, 2013

Did you know that you can trade in your AED and trade up to a “new” recertified AED? It’s a new program to School Kids Healthcare and we’re really excited to be able to share it with you.  It’s simple, just give us a call and let us know what model AED you’d like to […]

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National Breast Cancer Awareness Month

October 11, 2013

Did you realize that except for skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women? Breast cancer does not only affect women, but men too. In 2009 (the most recent year with available statistics) 211,731 women and 2001 men in the United Sates were diagnosed with breast cancer. That same year 40,676 […]

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